Expedio team triples in size to meet growing demand

It’s been an exciting period for the team at Expedio.

In the last two quarters, we’ve seen our team of consultants and support staff rapidly grow to meet demand for always accurate data.

It’s no wonder – having access to immediate and accurate data is critical.

With increasing global demand for advanced data capture and data management, Expedio has been experiencing a significant increase in resource industry participants seeking to get their data sorted.

Our premium service delivers always accurate data

Our clients have confidence in their data, knowing they’re supported by a longstanding team of highly experienced geo-scientists and IT personnel with ‘hands-on’ experience and in-depth understanding of the mining industry.

Our services are set apart from the rest because we’re agile and nimble, resulting in quicker implementations and advanced yet user friendly and cost effective solutions.

Built on the innovative data management platform OCRIS, Expedio delivers streamlined solutions via a single interface integrated with centralised and standardised business rules ensuring  a ‘single source of truth’ across divisions.

Get immediate & accurate data with Expedio

Contact us to discover how your business can benefit from immediate and accurate data delivered with exceptional customer service.

Get in touch on 1300 496 006 or at info@expedio.com.au.

We’re happy to help!

Expedio to support new junior explorer to get their data sorted from the beginning

Expedio is proud to announce it has been appointed as data management provider for new junior explorer Cygnus Gold Limited.

Cygnus Gold Limited has contracted Perth-based Expedio to implement industry best practise data collection and management solutions ahead of their upcoming drilling program. Expedio will manage all geological data requirements for Cygnus including historic open source data from within their project areas.

Cygnus Gold Limited will benefit from outsourcing their IT infrastructure and staffing overheads while having the assurance their data is managed with the highest technical standards and combined centuries of experience from the expert team at Expedio. This support model ensures efficiency and immediate access to data, as well as the adherence to stringent business rules and statutory compliance.

Expedio’s single interface data management solution integrated with centralised and standardised outputs and advanced reports ensure Cygnus Gold Limited is operating from a ‘single source of truth’ across divisions. Expedio’s innovative data logging solution can be used even when offline, which means that Cygnus Gold Limited will be collecting fast, accurate and dependable data no matter what.

“Having access to immediate and accurate geological data delivered by excellent customer service is crucial for mining and exploration companies,” said Lara Groves, Expedio Managing Director. “With an 18-year history of providing cost effective and successful solutions, we’re confident Expedio will be delivering fantastic operational and compliance outcomes for Cygnus Gold Limited now and into the future.”

“Cygnus Gold recognises that having a high quality database and data management systems is critical to the success of the company,” said James Merrillees, Cygnus CEO. “Cygnus is pleased to team up with Expedio at this early stage and we look forward to working together as we build shareholder value through discovery success.”

For media contact information, please refer to our Media Release.

Get immediate & accurate data – how mine sites can remove the wait

Having access to immediate and accurate data is crucial for mining companies to perform.

Data impacts such a wide range of functions across operations and divisions, from Logging Geologists, Geology Supervisors, Plant Operators, Plant Supervisors, Resource Modellers and Mining Engineers.

Enabling accurate and immediate data that is in consistent practical formats, from a single source of truth, and is usable across divisions is more than a ‘nice to have’. It’s critical.

Why is it the case that accurate data is not always immediately available for those who need it most?

Common causes of delays in data

Mine sites around the world face substantial difficulties with their data flow and data management.

As a result, the data can be fragmented and delivered in any number of different formats.

When a non-observational style of geological logging occurs, this creates additional delays and hinders to the flow of data.

Sifting through all of this data, interpreting it, double-checking it and communicating it in a relevant way to the various roles that rely on the data can be labour-intensive and time consuming.

It’s not uncommon for data to be delayed up to the three months in these scenarios.

What is the solution?

  • Mining companies need access to a database they can manage themselves. A self-managed database with external, independent support when required, ensures efficiency and immediate access to data.
  • A data logging solution that can be used offline is vital.
  • Where geologists have to adjust logs to fit standard geological blocks, delays can occur. Standardised interfaces which adjust the logging style of the geologists to an observational technique can reduce data logging time substantially.
  • Implementing a stringent data management process which streamlines the workflow of uploading data from the field logger to the production database, not only ensures accuracy and speed of data, it’s an important part of compliance
  • A single interface data management solution integrated with centralised and standardised business rules ensures a ‘single source of truth’ across divisions.

Get immediate & accurate data with Expedio

Contact us to discover how your business can benefit from immediate and accurate data delivered with exceptional customer service.

Get in touch on 1300 496 006 or at info@expedio.com.au.

We’re happy to help!

A driller and a geologist walk into a bar

If a driller and a geologist walk into a bar with a willingness to teach and listen to each other, they’ll both soon realize the benefits of working together for project success.

CORING MAGAZINE JULY 29, 2016

The title may sound like the start of a bad joke, but this article aims to delve deeper into the relationship between geologists and drillers in the exploration and mining industries.

These two professions are central and are at times glorified, with the heroic notion of a steely-eyed geologist intently focused on a small, glistening rock chip while the brawny, tanned driller pulls steel rods somewhere on a remote mountain top.  Unfortunately, reality is more like two old men bickering over invoices or complaining about clogged cyclones. Whether we want to believe it or not, these two professions, as different as their backgrounds or personal interests may be, are kindred spirits who have much to gain and learn from one another if they simply take the time to talk and listen.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://coringmagazine.com/article/a-driller-and-a-geologist-walk-into-a-bar/

First signs of improvement in two years

“It’s absolutely essential that geoscientists experiencing tough employment conditions do not lose contact with their profession, peers and colleagues” AIG President, Mr Mike Erceg

First light at the end of a very long jobless tunnel for Australia’s geos?  READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

The jobs outlook for Australia’s geoscientists has shown the first small signs of improvement in two years with the number of professional geoscientists in Australia seeking work or unable to secure satisfactory self-employment, falling fell in the June quarter compared with the preceding period.

The survey received 1095 responses this quarter from an estimated 6,000 geoscientists in Australia, working in all sectors of exploration and mining, government, education, research, environment and a range of other fields of practice.

On a state by state basis, decreases in both unemployment and under-employment were evident in all states except South Australia where unemployment remained static but under-employment  amongst self-employed geoscientists increased.

Geoscientist unemployment and under-employment in Australia June 2009 – June 2016
Geoscientist unemployment and under-employment in Australia June 2009 – June 2016

Case Study – A well-established Diamond mine

Diamond

Case Study

A well-established Canadian diamond mine in the Lac de Gras region, Northern Territories

PROBLEM

  1. Difficulties with data flow and data management
  2. Data was fragmented and in many different formats
  3. A non-observational style of geological logging was causing delays and hindering data flow
  4. 3 month delays to use collected data lead to frustrated geologists and management

SOLUTION

Self-managed database – Expedio introduced a self-managed database solution and provide support

Data Logging: Expedio implemented a data logging solution that could be used offline with a standardised interface that adjusted the logging style of the geologists to an observational technique. This technique reduced logging time as geologists were no longer adjusting logs to fit standard geological blocks

OCRIS Logix: A stringent data management process that streamlined the workflow of uploading data from the field logger to the production database.

OCRIS Model: Expedio’s single interface data management solution integrated with our anywhere logging software centralised and standardised all company data.

Data Management: Expedio removed the frustration of waiting months for valid usable data. Data is now usable within hours of it being collected in the field. This allowed for the collection of analytics on production which identified inefficiencies that could be addressed. Centralising and standardising the data provided Logging Geologist, Geology Supervisor, Plant Operators, Plant Supervisors, Diamond Pickers, Resource Modellers and Mining Engineers access to the most current data set as required.

GBIS/Geobank Optimisation: A decade of experience in optimising GBIS/Geobank systems allowed Expedio to get the most out of the client’s current data management system.

OUTCOME

Support OCRIS Logix was delivered to the client onsite, with remote support by Expedio.

Robust system – The self-managed system has required little to no maintenance since its implementation over 5 years ago.

Validated data – A single source of validated data ensured all departments are using the latest reliable and accurate  data sets.

Reporting – Data is now available to all departments within hours of collection, management can now act decisively regarding their resource and production in real time.

MESSAGE

The driving force behind any data management system is that it delivers Always Accurate Data

expedio

Case Study – A large gold miner in North Sumatra

NorthSumatraGoldMine

Case Study

A large gold miner in North Sumatra, Indonesia

PROBLEM

  1. Complicated data entry systems
  2. Non-standard assay management system
  3. Geologist and field staff were logging on paper in the pit
  4. Slow turnaround for grade control data users from capture to reconciliation stages
  5. No consistency and no data flow control mechanisms
  6. Non-compliance: A culture of database schema changes to force non-valid data into the database
  7. Non-compliance: Allowing non-valid data into the database compromised the veracity of the dataset and compounded several major issues within the database
  8. Language and cultural barrier to locate the source of their data issues
  9. Several generations of data consultancies had tried and failed to solve large scale issues in the importing, validating, exporting and reporting of the data.

SOLUTION

Database solution – A self-managed database solution with support from Expedio

OCRIS Mobile: Expedio designed and implemented a robust data capture solution customised with the client’s business rules, validation and formulas. Changes are delivered quickly and easily applied

OCRIS Logix: A stringent data management process from field logging to data management with a full, demonstrable audit trail.

OCRIS Model: Expedio introduced a standardised and secure data management system using Expedio’s own schema design and software configuration optimised for Gbis / Geobank Increased database security controls allowed the company to regain and maintain  the veracity of their database.

Global experience: Years of experience working around the world meant Expedio was able to address cultural and language barriers by building trust with the onsite staff and deliver on our proposed solutions

Custom validation: Customised rules and views ensured non-valid data would be unable to corrupt the new schema. With these rules in place Expedio was able to validate and audit their entire dataset and correct many historic data issues

GBIS/Geobank Optimisation: A decade of experience in optimising GBIS/Geobank systems allowed Expedio to get the most out of the client’s current data management software.

OUTCOME

Data Capture – Field logging process delivering a clean, controlled and rapid flow of data with errors trapped and corrected at the point of capture by the user

Export data on demand – Users can generate ready to use data on demand in standard formats for each production department in addition to automated mailouts of QC data results

Dataset control – Validation rules, views and security permissions

Data Management – By outsourcing the development and support to Expedio, onsite staff can now focus on the day to day data management. The data managers can now provide clean, valid and effective data to the Geologist, Engineers, Metallurgists and Surveyors onsite.

MESSAGE

The driving force behind any data management system is that it delivers Always Accurate Data

expedio

pXRF Reveals Stone-Age Industry with Staggering Output

pXRF Reveals Stone-Age Industry with Staggering Output

ObsidianMine

Under a cloudy winter sky, the eastern slope of Mount Arteni has the dull monotone of a barren wasteland. At 6,715 feet, its spare crest is dwarfed by the snow-capped 13,419-foot summit of nearby Mount Aragats, the highest point in the Republic of Armenia. The only signs of life are ragged clumps of wild grass, bent horizontal in a frigid wind from the high Caucasus.

Then the clouds suddenly break, and Arteni explodes into a dazzling mosaic of sunlit mirrors. Every square foot of ground, as far as the eye can see, is carpeted with fragments of glassy obsidian, many of them chipped and flaked into razor-sharp weapons and tools.

“We are looking at the remains of a gigantic open-air workshop,” says archaeologist Boris Gasparyan of Armenia’s National Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology. Countless blades, hand axes, scrapers, chisels, arrowheads, and spearheads produced at the mountainside “factory” circulated over a vast exchange network that long precedes the oldest recorded instances of formal trade.

Equipped with new technology that can precisely identify the origin of obsidian tools—even down to a single lava vein in a specific volcano—scientists have come to believe that Arteni was a central component in what amounts to a far-reaching Paleolithic arms industry. Its products have been traced north over the Caucasus to present-day Ukraine and west across Anatolia to the Aegean, almost 1,600 miles away.

Estimates of Arteni’s output are staggering. Active production is thought to date back to the Lower Stone Age, when the region’s first skilled artisans were early Neanderthals. Their successors mined the same materials up to 1000 B.C.E. Gasparyan and his Armenian associates, along with their American, Japanese, and European collaborators, have harvested thousands of Paleolithic tools at Arteni and other local sites.

They have barely scratched the surface, he says: “The number of obsidian implements here from different periods, from the Paleolithic to the Bronze and Iron Ages, is impossible to count. It is in the millions.”

Technology’s Windows on the Stone Age

pXRF

Scholars had long recognized the importance of the Caucasus in the saga of human history. But the violent convulsions of the 20th century—two world wars, the Russian Revolution, and the establishment of the Soviet Union, which annexed the region in the 1920s—held research to a minimum. With the Soviet collapse at the end of the 1980s, archaeology came to a complete halt. Although Armenia gained its independence in 1991, more than a decade passed before the extraordinary wealth of its resources was understood.

By 2011, says anthropologist Ellery Frahm of the University of Minnesota, it wasn’t unusual for international teams to collect 500 obsidian artifacts in Armenia in one day, numbers that quickly outran traditional methods.

Frahm met the challenge by refining two key advances in determining the origin of obsidian. The first worked on the principle that trace elements in a sample can be chemically matched to the volcano where it was produced. In effect, it bears a chemical “fingerprint.”

The conventional testing procedure was expensive and time-consuming, depending on specialized laboratories distant from archaeological sites, and requiring that artifacts be ground into a fine powder. Confronted with Armenia’s volume of artifacts, Frahm said, it was crucial “to take sourcing from the realm of ‘white coats’ in a lab to ‘muddy boots’ in the field.”

His solution was the pXRF, a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument with the dimensions and weight of a cordless drill, which can analyze an artifact’s chemical composition in ten seconds without pulverizing it. Although it had been in laboratory use for several years, the device wasn’t employed extensively in the field until 2011, when Frahm began adapting it for Gasparyan-led projects. Since then, he says, “We have analyzed more obsidian specimens than all other prior studies in Armenia combined.”

He followed up in 2014 with a more innovative procedure, developed at Minnesota’s Institute for Rock Magnetism. Frahm and his colleagues focused on tiny black grains of magnetite, an iron oxide with magnetic properties, which are suspended in obsidian and give it its ebony color. Magnetic measurements, explains Frahm, “can reveal how these grains differ in size, shape and composition from one portion of an obsidian flow relative to another part,” he says.

The measurements fine-tune source data dramatically, yielding a far more detailed fingerprint and shedding valuable light on the toolmakers’ work habits. Did they always mine a preferred seam of obsidian, or did they move from one former lava flow to another for reasons that are not yet clear? Put simply, Frahm says, using a term borrowed from the modern arms industry, the goal was to open a window on “Neanderthal procurement strategies in Armenia.”

Original article by Frank Viviano of National Geographic, view the full article here

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Expedio – Always Accurate Data 

Expedio Top Tip – Code Compliance

Code Compliance

Expedio’s Top Tip for May keeping Code Compliance:

Data Mining Code Compliance

Having inconsistent logging codes within a data set will cause major issues when modelling the data. “how do I use this – I can’t model my geology, how do I put this on a section?”  This can be caused by a field geologists creating there own codes in the field “Im not sure what this is, ill just use ???”

The old data management proverb of “S*** in S*** out” comes to mind.

Enforcing company codes is important, consistency in logging is the key. Having a standard set of codes allows data collected to be consistent from geologist to geologist, Field assistant to Field assistant.

Having a field logging tool that has built in checks for valid numeric ranges and valid logging codes like OCRIS Mobile is essential.

Having a process for adding new codes within your company will kept consistency when new codes are required.

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Expedio – Always Accurate Data 

Boy, 15, discovers ancient Mayan city using constellations and Google Earth

GettyImages-107336394-large_trans++yrExcyLmJ2rXkhVv_9NiELMgJa5sK6WpbOg8eJ81aug

 

I was really surprised and excited when I realised that the most brilliant stars of the constellations matched the largest Maya citiesWilliam Gadoury

DEEP within a dense Central American forest sit the ruins of an ancient city the world forgot.

And it has just been discovered by a precocious 15-year-old boy.

Quebec teenager William Gadoury claims he has discovered a long-lost ancient Mayan city using a clever combination of old-world astronomy and ultra-modern technology.

The inquisitive youngster, who has a deep fascination with ancient Maya, analysed 22 Mayan constellations and realised that the Mayans aligned their 117 cities with the positions of the stars.

It was the first time a researcher had made a direct correlation between the stars and the locations of the Mayan cities, the Journal de Montreal reported.

But William pressed on with his research, eventually coming to realise that there was one star in another constellation that didn’t appear to have a corresponding city.

If his theory and calculations were correct, that would place the missing city in a remote coastal location on the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. Using satellite images from the Canadian Space Agency and Google Earth maps, William zeroed in on the precise location — and a pyramid and about thirty ancient buildings were spotted, partially hidden, in the dense forest.

“There are linear features that would suggest there is something underneath that big canopy,”  Canadian Space Agency liaison officer Daniel de Lisle told The Independent.
“There are enough items to suggest it could be a man-made structure.”  William has named the lost city K’aak Chi, or Mouth of Fire. It is believed to be one of the five largest Mayan cities on record.
The discovery has won William praise from space agencies in Canada and Japan as well as NASA. He’s also become a local hero in Quebec.
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